Wednesday, May 31, 2017

SquashJack.com

Come on, SquashJack.com, who do you think you're fooling?

Your article from May 31 is titled: "Man aims to mow grass in all 50 states for those in need."

Fox News's article from May 30 is titled: "Man aims to mow grass in all 50 states for those in need."

Your opening:
A man on a mission plans to mow grass in all 50 states stopped in Kansas City on Monday.  Rodney Smith Jr., started an organization that mows lawns for single mothers, veterans, and older Americans. He’s based out of Huntsville, Alabama and says he got the idea a couple of years ago when he saw an older man struggling to cut his grass.  He says his mission is rewarding.
The opening from FoxNews.com:
A man on a mission to mow grass in all 50 states stopped in Kansas City on Monday.  Rodney Smith Jr., started an organization that mows lawns for single mothers, veterans and older Americans. He's based out of Huntsville, Alabama and says he got the idea a couple of years ago when he saw an older man struggling to cut his grass. He says his mission is rewarding.
You're copying words from another news source without giving credit.  And you've got ads from AdChoices on your page?  That's just sketchy.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

media/media

Damn, why didn't I ever hear about this trick to get around the Wall Street Journal paywall?  As a future member of the media, I should be in the know: https://www.buzzfeed.com/matthewzeitlin/rip-media-media?utm_term=.wd1YbJPNPW#.bdNKLkJmJ8

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

VirginiaNews.co

How strange.  There's a new website, VirginiaNews.co, which is straight-up mimicking the homepage of a TEGNA news site, WUSA9.com. Here's an archive of the VirginiaNews.co homepage: http://archive.is/MsE0f.  All the links lead to WUSA9.com.  I guess the person responsible just wanted an authentic-looking homepage.

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Ervse.com

Come on, Ervse.com.  Who are you trying to fool?

You published an article on May 16 titled "Police officer to donate kidney to boy, 8, she just met."

KETV published on article on May 16 titled "Police officer to donate kidney to boy, 8, she just met."

Your opening:
A police officer in Rock County is going out of her way to donate a kidney to a little boy she’d just met.   
Milton Township police officer Lindsey Bittorf was going through Facebook in early December when she saw a post from a Janesville mother who’d made a public appeal for potential donors.   
Kristi Goll turned to social media after years of testing determined that friends and family weren’t a match for her boy, 8-year-old Jackson Arneson, who was born with a condition called Posterior Urethral Valves. 
KETV's opening:
A police officer in Wisconsin is going above and beyond the call of duty to donate a kidney to a little boy she'd just met.  
Milton Township police officer Lindsey Bittorf was perusing Facebook in early December when she came across a post from a Janesville mother who'd made a public plea for potential donors.  
Kristi Goll turned to social media after years of testing determined that friends and family weren't a match for her boy, 8-year-old Jackson Arneson, who was born with a condition called Posterior Urethral Valves.
You took KETV's content, and then loaded up your page with advertisements from AdChoices.  That's not right, bro.  (Archive of the Ervse article: http://archive.is/25eij)

Sunday, May 14, 2017

Hybriders.com

Come on, Hybriders.com, who are you trying to fool?

Your article from May 8 was titled "Comcast and Charter partner to push into wireless service."

Engadget's article from May 8 was titled "Comcast and Charter partner to push into wireless service."

Your first two paragraphs, which were written by CathyLaw:
In recent years, a number of telecommunication and media giants have attempted some major mergers (sometimes unsuccessfully) to consolidate power — a move that often leaves customers with less choice. While Comcast and Charter Communications aren’t merging, they did announce a new partnership today that aims the considerable power of the two companies right at the wireless industry. The partnership is rather vague for now, but it sounds like the two companies will be working together to make a substantial push into competing directly with Verizon and AT&T. 
Right now, both Comcast and Charter have agreements with Verizon in which they can lease wireless spectrum and re-sell it to their own customers. But this agreement binds the two telecommunications giants together such that neither company can make a major merger or acquisition relating to wireless without the other’s consent. Many in the media are already speculating that this partnership means the two companies are looking to team up and purchase one of the smaller wireless carriers, like Sprint or T-Mobile, to accelerate their entry into the market.

Engadget's first two paragraphs, which were written by Nathan Ingraham:
In recent years, a number of telecommunication and media giants have attempted some major mergers (sometimes unsuccessfully) to consolidate power -- a move that often leaves customers with less choice. While Comcast and Charter Communications aren't merging, they did announce a new partnership today that aims the considerable power of the two companies right at the wireless industry. The partnership is rather vague for now, but it sounds like the two companies will be working together to make a substantial push into competing directly with Verizon and AT&T. 
Right now, both Comcast and Charter have agreements with Verizon in which they can lease wireless spectrum and re-sell it to their own customers. But this agreement binds the two telecommunications giants together such that neither company can make a major merger or acquisition relating to wireless without the other's consent. Many in the media are already speculating that this partnership means the two companies are looking to team up and purchase one of the smaller wireless carriers, like Sprint or T-Mobile, to accelerate their entry into the market.
You're just taking Engadget's content and passing it off as your own.  And you've got an AdChoices box and some embedded video for Goa Luxury Indian Vacations?  That's just sketchy.

Friday, May 12, 2017

Keoler.com

Come on, Keoler.com.  Who are you trying to fool?

Your article from May 12 was titled:
"Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surface"

A Phys.org article from May 11 was titled:
"Ancient Mars impacts created tornado-like winds that scoured surface"

Your first two paragraphs:
Brown University geologist Peter Schultz observed sets of strange bright streaks coming from a few large-impact craters on the planet’s surface. The streaks are strange because they extend much farther from the craters than normal ejecta patterns, and they are only visible in thermal infrared images taken during the Martian night.  
Using geological observation, laboratory impact experiments and computer modeling, Schultz and Brown graduate student Stephanie Quintana have offered a new explanation for how those streaks were formed. They show that tornado-like wind vortices created by crater-forming impacts and swirling at 500 miles per hour or more, scoured the surface and blasted away dust and small rocks to expose the blockier surfaces beneath.
The first two paragraphs from Phys.org:
In looking at NASA images of Mars a few years ago, Brown University geologist Peter Schultz noticed sets of strange bright streaks emanating from a few large-impact craters on the planet's surface. The streaks are odd in that they extend much farther from the craters than normal ejecta patterns, and they are only visible in thermal infrared images taken during the Martian night.  
Using geological observation, laboratory impact experiments and computer modeling, Schultz and Brown graduate student Stephanie Quintana have offered a new explanation for how those streaks were formed. They show that tornado-like wind vortices—generated by crater-forming impacts and swirling at 500 miles per hour or more—scoured the surface and blasted away dust and small rocks to expose the blockier surfaces beneath.
You're just taking the words from Phys.org and changing a few of them.  AND you're making money with Google AdChoices?  That ain't right.  Not to mention, you've got 40,000+ pageviews on your ripoff article?  That's no small bananas.

Thursday, May 11, 2017

Techiwire.com

Come on, Techiwire.com.  Who are you trying to fool?

Your article from May 10 was titled:
"Space weather model simulates solar storms from nowhere."

A Phys.org article from May 8 was titled:
"Space weather model simulates solar storms from nowhere."

Your first paragraph:
The always changing sun constantly shoots solar material into space. The biggest of such events are massive clouds that erupt from the sun, called coronal mass ejections, or CMEs. These solar storms often come first with warning such as the bright flash of a flare, a burst of heat, or a flurry of solar energetic particles. But another kind of storm has puzzled scientists for its lack of typical warning signs as they seem to appear from nowhere, and scientists call them stealth CMEs.
The first paragraph from Phys.org:
Our ever-changing sun continuously shoots solar material into space. The grandest such events are massive clouds that erupt from the sun, called coronal mass ejections, or CMEs. These solar storms often come first with some kind of warning—the bright flash of a flare, a burst of heat or a flurry of solar energetic particles. But another kind of storm has puzzled scientists for its lack of typical warning signs: They seem to come from nowhere, and scientists call them stealth CMEs.
You're just taking the words from Phys.org and changing a few of them.  AND you're making money with Google AdChoices?  That ain't right.